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Sunbelt Diaspora: Race Class and Latino Politic...
46,49 € *
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Sunbelt Diaspora: Race Class and Latino Politics in Puerto Rican Orlando ab 46.49 EURO

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Stand: 30.03.2020
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A Sociolinguistics of Diaspora
49,99 € *
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A Sociolinguistics of Diaspora ab 49.99 EURO Latino Practices Identities and Ideologies

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 30.03.2020
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Diaspora Studies in Education
127,95 € *
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The Latino/a diaspora is undoubtedly transforming the demographics and cultural geographies of the United States. Diaspora Studies in Education advances an active use of the concept of "diaspora", focusing on processes that impact the diasporization of the Latino/a population, and more specifically, examining those diasporization processes in the arena of education. Focusing on the education of Puerto Ricans, the second largest Latino/a subgroup, the authors of this volume elucidate themes that are useful not only for those concerned with the education of Puerto Rican youth but also applicable to the study of other diasporic communities. The book is useful as a text in a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses, including foundations of education, multicultural education, anthropology of education, and introductory courses in Latino and ethnic studies departments.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 30.03.2020
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Music in the American Diasporic Wedding
54,90 CHF *
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Michael Allemana is a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago and a professional jazz guitarist. Lorena Alvarado is Assistant Professor in the Global Arts Studies Program at the University of California, Merced. Frances R. Aparicio is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University. She is author of Listening to Salsa: Gender, Latino Popular Music, and Puerto Rican Cultures, and editor with Candida F. Jaquez of Musical Migrations: Transnationalism and Cultural Hybridity in Latin/o America. Timothy J. Cooley is Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is editor with Gregory F. Barz of Shadows in the Field: New Perspectives for Fieldwork in Ethnomusicology, and author of Making Music in the Polish Tatras: Tourists, Ethnographers, and Mountain Musicians and Surfing about Music. Kaley Mason is Assistant Professor of Music at Lewis & Clark College. Alejandro L. Madrid is Professor of Musicology and Ethnomusicology at Cornell University. He is the recipient of international awards, including the 2017 Dent Medal for 'outstanding contributions to musicology' from the Royal Musical Association and the International Musicological Society. He is the author of nine books on transnational flows in Latin American music. Tanya Merchant is Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is author of From Courtyard to Conservatory: Women Musicians of Tashkent. Ian MacMillen is Assistant Professor of Russian and East European Studies and Director of the Oberlin Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at Oberlin College. Inna Naroditskaya is Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music. She is author of Bewitching Russian Opera: The Tsarina from State to Stage, Song from the Land of Fire: Continuity and Change in Azerbaijani Mugham, and co-editor of several volumes, including Music of the Sirens. Hankus Netsky, a multi-instrumentalist, composer, and scholar is a co-chair of Contemporary Improvisation at New England Conservatory. He is author of Klezmer: Music and Community in 20thCentury Jewish Philadelphia. Ameera Nimjee is a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago. Nina C. ¿man is a Teaching and Research Fellow at the Department of Music, University of Pennsylvania and a Visiting Lecturer in North American Studies at the University of Helsinki. A. J. Racy is Distinguished Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of California at Los Angeles and a performer and composer. He is author of Making Music in the Arab World: The Culture and Artistry of Tarab. Meredith Schweig is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Emory University. Carol Silverman is Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Folklore at the University of Oregon. She is author of Romani Routes: Cultural Politics and Balkan Music in Diaspora.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.03.2020
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Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora
86,90 CHF *
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A volume in Education Policy in Practice: Critical Cultural Studies Series Editors Edmund T. Hamann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Rodney Hopson, George Mason University For most of US history, most of America's Latino population has lived in nine states-California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Illinois, Florida, New Jersey, and New York. It follows that most education research that considered the experiences of Latino families with US schools came from these same states. But in the last 30 years Latinos have been resettling across the US, attending schools, and creating new patterns of inter-ethnic interaction in educational settings. Much of this interaction with this New Latino Diaspora has been initially tentative and improvisational, but too often it has left intact the patterns of lower educational success that have prevailed in the traditional Latino diaspora. Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora is an extensive update, with all new material, of the groundbreaking volume Education in the New Latino Diaspora (Ablex Publishing) that these same editors produced in 2002. This volume consciously includes a number of junior scholars (e.g., C. Allen Lynn, Soria Colomer, Amanda Morales, Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Adam Sawyer) and more established ones (Frances Contreras, Jason Irizarry, Socorro Herrera, Linda Harklau) as it considers empirical cases from Washington State to Georgia, from the Mid-Atlantic to the Great Plains, where rural, suburban, and urban communities start their second or third decades of responding to a previously unprecedented growth in newcomer Latino populations. With excuses of surprise and improvisational strategies less persuasive as Latino newcomer populations become less new, this volume considers the persistence, the anomie, and pragmatism of Latino newcomers on the one hand, with the variously enlightened, paternalistic, dismissive, and xenophobic responses of educators and education systems on the other. With foci as personal as accounts of growing up as an adoptee in a mixed race family and the testimonio of a 'successful' undocumented college graduate to the macro scale of examining state-level education policies and with an age range from early childhood education to the university level, this volume insists that the worlds of education research and migration studies can both gain from considering the educational responses in the last two decades to the 'newish' Latino presence in the 41 U.S. states that have not long been the home to large, well-established Latino populations, but that now enroll 2.5 million Latino students in K-12 alone.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.03.2020
Zum Angebot
Music in the American Diasporic Wedding
127,00 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Michael Allemana is a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago and a professional jazz guitarist. Lorena Alvarado is Assistant Professor in the Global Arts Studies Program at the University of California, Merced. Frances R. Aparicio is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University. She is author of Listening to Salsa: Gender, Latino Popular Music, and Puerto Rican Cultures, and editor with Candida F. Jaquez of Musical Migrations: Transnationalism and Cultural Hybridity in Latin/o America. Timothy J. Cooley is Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is editor with Gregory F. Barz of Shadows in the Field: New Perspectives for Fieldwork in Ethnomusicology, and author of Making Music in the Polish Tatras: Tourists, Ethnographers, and Mountain Musicians and Surfing about Music. Kaley Mason is Assistant Professor of Music at Lewis & Clark College. Alejandro L. Madrid is Professor of Musicology and Ethnomusicology at Cornell University. He is the recipient of international awards, including the 2017 Dent Medal for 'outstanding contributions to musicology' from the Royal Musical Association and the International Musicological Society. He is the author of nine books on transnational flows in Latin American music. Tanya Merchant is Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is author of From Courtyard to Conservatory: Women Musicians of Tashkent. Ian MacMillen is Assistant Professor of Russian and East European Studies and Director of the Oberlin Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at Oberlin College. Inna Naroditskaya is Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music. She is author of Bewitching Russian Opera: The Tsarina from State to Stage, Song from the Land of Fire: Continuity and Change in Azerbaijani Mugham, and co-editor of several volumes, including Music of the Sirens. Hankus Netsky, a multi-instrumentalist, composer, and scholar is a co-chair of Contemporary Improvisation at New England Conservatory. He is author of Klezmer: Music and Community in 20thCentury Jewish Philadelphia. Ameera Nimjee is a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago. Nina C. ¿man is a Teaching and Research Fellow at the Department of Music, University of Pennsylvania and a Visiting Lecturer in North American Studies at the University of Helsinki. A. J. Racy is Distinguished Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of California at Los Angeles and a performer and composer. He is author of Making Music in the Arab World: The Culture and Artistry of Tarab. Meredith Schweig is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Emory University. Carol Silverman is Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Folklore at the University of Oregon. She is author of Romani Routes: Cultural Politics and Balkan Music in Diaspora.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.03.2020
Zum Angebot
Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora...
158,00 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

A volume in Education Policy in Practice: Critical Cultural Studies Series Editors Edmund T. Hamann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Rodney Hopson, George Mason University For most of US history, most of America's Latino population has lived in nine states-California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Illinois, Florida, New Jersey, and New York. It follows that most education research that considered the experiences of Latino families with US schools came from these same states. But in the last 30 years Latinos have been resettling across the US, attending schools, and creating new patterns of inter-ethnic interaction in educational settings. Much of this interaction with this New Latino Diaspora has been initially tentative and improvisational, but too often it has left intact the patterns of lower educational success that have prevailed in the traditional Latino diaspora. Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora is an extensive update, with all new material, of the groundbreaking volume Education in the New Latino Diaspora (Ablex Publishing) that these same editors produced in 2002. This volume consciously includes a number of junior scholars (e.g., C. Allen Lynn, Soria Colomer, Amanda Morales, Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Adam Sawyer) and more established ones (Frances Contreras, Jason Irizarry, Socorro Herrera, Linda Harklau) as it considers empirical cases from Washington State to Georgia, from the Mid-Atlantic to the Great Plains, where rural, suburban, and urban communities start their second or third decades of responding to a previously unprecedented growth in newcomer Latino populations. With excuses of surprise and improvisational strategies less persuasive as Latino newcomer populations become less new, this volume considers the persistence, the anomie, and pragmatism of Latino newcomers on the one hand, with the variously enlightened, paternalistic, dismissive, and xenophobic responses of educators and education systems on the other. With foci as personal as accounts of growing up as an adoptee in a mixed race family and the testimonio of a 'successful' undocumented college graduate to the macro scale of examining state-level education policies and with an age range from early childhood education to the university level, this volume insists that the worlds of education research and migration studies can both gain from considering the educational responses in the last two decades to the 'newish' Latino presence in the 41 U.S. states that have not long been the home to large, well-established Latino populations, but that now enroll 2.5 million Latino students in K-12 alone.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.03.2020
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The Dominican Republic
27,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

An incredible, informative collection of essays, oral histories, poetry, fiction, analysis, interviews, primary documents, beautifully illustrated timelines, maps and interactive & interdisciplinary teaching aids on the history, politics, and culture of the fourth largest Latino community in the United States. Authors include Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, Junot Diaz, Rhina P. Espaillat, Pedro Mir, Josefina Baez and Sherezada Vicioso (Chiqui). The readings are organized into the following sections: Geography, History, Economy; Migration and the Dominican Diaspora; Shaping A Dominican Identity: Language, Race, and Gender; Haitian-Dominican Relations; The National Goes Global: Dominican Music and Baseball. Ideal as background text for students or book groups reading literature by Dominican authors, communities with Dominican-American students, and for everyone interested in this Caribbean country with its rather long history of U.S. involvement.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.03.2020
Zum Angebot
Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora
59,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

For most of US history, most of America's Latino population has lived in nine states-California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Illinois, Florida, New Jersey, and New York. It follows that most education research that considered the experiences of Latino families with US schools came from these same states. But in the last 30 years Latinos have been resettling across the US, attending schools, and creating new patterns of inter-ethnic interaction in educational settings. Much of this interaction with this New Latino Diaspora has been initially tentative and improvisational, but too often it has left intact the patterns of lower educational success that have prevailed in the traditional Latino diaspora. Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora is an extensive update, with all new material, of the groundbreaking volume Education in the New Latino Diaspora (Ablex Publishing) that these same editors produced in 2002. This volume consciously includes a number of junior scholars (e.g., C. Allen Lynn, Soria Colomer, Amanda Morales, Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Adam Sawyer) and more established ones (Frances Contreras, Jason Irizarry, Socorro Herrera, Linda Harklau) as it considers empirical cases from Washington State to Georgia, from the Mid-Atlantic to the Great Plains, where rural, suburban, and urban communities start their second or third decades of responding to a previously unprecedented growth in newcomer Latino populations. With excuses of surprise and improvisational strategies less persuasive as Latino newcomer populations become less new, this volume considers the persistence, the anomie, and pragmatism of Latino newcomers on the one hand, with the variously enlightened, paternalistic, dismissive, and xenophobic responses of educators and education systems on the other. With foci as personal as accounts of growing up as an adoptee in a mixed race family and the testimonio of a 'successful' undocumented college graduate to the macro scale of examining state-level education policies and with an age range from early childhood education to the university level, this volume insists that the worlds of education research and migration studies can both gain from considering the educational responses in the last two decades to the 'newish' Latino presence in the 41 U.S. states that have not long been the home to large, wellestablished Latino populations, but that now enroll 2.5 million Latino students in K-12 alone. 'Timely and compelling, Revisiting Education in the NLD offers new insight into the Latino Diaspora in the US just as the discussions regarding immigration policy, bilingual education, and immigrant rights are gaining steam. Drawing from a variety of perspectives, contributing authors interrogate the very concept of the diaspora. The wide range of research in this volume thoughtfully illustrates the nuanced phenomena and provides rich descriptions of complex situations. No longer a simple question of immigration, the book considers language and legal status in schools, international adoption, teacher preparation, and the relationships between established and relatively new Latino communities in a variety of contexts. Comprised of rich, thoughtful research Revisiting Education provides a fascinating window into the context of Latino reception nationwide. ~ Rebecca M. Callahan, Associate Professor - University of Texas-Austin As the leader of a 10-years-and-counting research study in Mexico that has identified and interviewed transnationally mobile students with prior experience in U.S. schools, I can affirm that in addition to students with backgrounds in California, Arizona, Texas, and Colorado, migration links now join schools in Georgia, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Alabama, etc. to schools in Mexico. For that reason and many others I am excited to see this far-ranging, interdisciplinary, new text that considers policy implementation through lenses as different as teacher preparation, Latino adoption into culturally mixed families, the fate of Latino newcomers in 'low density' districts where there are few like them, and the misuse of Spanish teachers as interpreters. This is an relevant book for American educators and scholars, but also for readers beyond U.S. borders. Hamann, Wortham, Murillo, and

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.03.2020
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