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¡Si se puede! First-generation, latino immigrant
89,90 € *
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Latino students face many challenges on higher education campuses. These challenges require faculty and staff to respond in direct and meaningful ways. Often families have different backgrounds, backgrounds that warrant serious research. Understanding the student as a whole person means understating their families and where they came from. Sometimes this means looking for and listening to their voice. College administrators need to understand the motivational components of incoming Latino students to serve them well. In this transformative autoethonographic study, I focused on understanding stories told by one first-generation, immigrant Latino family s journey through higher education, and their challenges and successes attaining a degree in predominantly White institutions.I interviewed my parents, three sisters, and five brothers, I collected a plethora of data to co-construct meaning of my family experiences. I discovered five salient themes through analysis of the data: resilience, transformative learning, role models, no parent support, and acculturation. Implications for practice in the area of first generation, immigrants, Latino students, and gender inequality were discuss

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 24.01.2020
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Gonzalez, Mario: ¡Si se puede! First-generation...
89,90 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 11.07.2014, Medium: Taschenbuch, Einband: Kartoniert / Broschiert, Titel: ¡Si se puede! First-generation, latino immigrant, Autor: Gonzalez, Mario, Verlag: SPS, Sprache: Englisch, Rubrik: Bildungswesen (Schule // Hochschule), Seiten: 252, Informationen: Paperback, Gewicht: 392 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 24.01.2020
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Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health
117,69 € *
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The growing Latino population of the United States stands poised to shape the nation s future throughout the twenty-first century, yet serious obstacles hinder the full participation of the Latino community in American society. Access to mental health care poses a particular challenge for many segments of the population. Although significant scholarship has focused on the delivery of culturally competent practice, few academic resources address systemic issues that affect the actual delivery of services to Latino clients. In response, Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health provides the first interdisciplinary guide aimed at improving access to mental health services. Experts from several specialties provide state-of-the-art analyses and innovative strategies for tackling the structural, organizational, and linguistic issues that contribute to service inequities. Collectively, the book chapters call attention to clinical, geographical, and social contexts, as well as to populations as varied as breast cancer survivors, rural new growth communities, and unaccompanied immigrant youth. The authors provide an exquisite array of intersecting topics linked by a common theme: the need for a broad social response to transform mental health service for Latinos. Among the topics covered:· Infrastructure development aimed at specific dimensions of structural inequality· The role of government in facilitating the development of infrastructures· The need for federal policy to protect immigrants and aid in their incorporation · Building local infrastructures attuned to the specific needs of communities· Developing a bilingual workforce through interdisciplinary collaboration, organizational planning, and training of staff and interpreters · Addressing the mental health needs of Latino youth in the juvenile justice system· Expanding educational opportunities for first-generation college students· Supporting Latino families caring for persons with serious mental illness"An extraordinary contribution to multiple stakeholders. Provides guideposts for policy-makers, administrators, researchers and clinicians alike. -- Patricia Arredondo, EdD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of WI-Milwaukee This book's comprehensive compendium of knowledge of Latino mental health makes it indispensable reading not only for mental health professionals, social workers and educators but for all those interested in the psychology and culture of the fastest growing population in America. -- Pastora San Juan Cafferty, PhD, Professor Emerita, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago This book addresses tremendous gaps in the fields of Latino mental health and healthcare. Packed with useful information, innovative perspectives, and actionable policy recommendations, this interdisciplinary effort undoubtedly will become a go-to resource in meeting the mental-health needs of Latinos. -- Glenn Flores, MD, FAAP, Director, Division of General Pediatrics, Professor of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, and Public Health, The Judith and Charles Ginsburg Chair in Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center and Children's Medical Center Dallas

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 24.01.2020
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Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health
120,99 € *
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The growing Latino population of the United States stands poised to shape the nation s future throughout the twenty-first century, yet serious obstacles hinder the full participation of the Latino community in American society. Access to mental health care poses a particular challenge for many segments of the population. Although significant scholarship has focused on the delivery of culturally competent practice, few academic resources address systemic issues that affect the actual delivery of services to Latino clients. In response, Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health provides the first interdisciplinary guide aimed at improving access to mental health services. Experts from several specialties provide state-of-the-art analyses and innovative strategies for tackling the structural, organizational, and linguistic issues that contribute to service inequities. Collectively, the book chapters call attention to clinical, geographical, and social contexts, as well as to populations as varied as breast cancer survivors, rural new growth communities, and unaccompanied immigrant youth. The authors provide an exquisite array of intersecting topics linked by a common theme: the need for a broad social response to transform mental health service for Latinos. Among the topics covered:· Infrastructure development aimed at specific dimensions of structural inequality· The role of government in facilitating the development of infrastructures· The need for federal policy to protect immigrants and aid in their incorporation · Building local infrastructures attuned to the specific needs of communities· Developing a bilingual workforce through interdisciplinary collaboration, organizational planning, and training of staff and interpreters · Addressing the mental health needs of Latino youth in the juvenile justice system· Expanding educational opportunities for first-generation college students· Supporting Latino families caring for persons with serious mental illness"An extraordinary contribution to multiple stakeholders. Provides guideposts for policy-makers, administrators, researchers and clinicians alike. -- Patricia Arredondo, EdD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of WI-Milwaukee This book's comprehensive compendium of knowledge of Latino mental health makes it indispensable reading not only for mental health professionals, social workers and educators but for all those interested in the psychology and culture of the fastest growing population in America. -- Pastora San Juan Cafferty, PhD, Professor Emerita, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago This book addresses tremendous gaps in the fields of Latino mental health and healthcare. Packed with useful information, innovative perspectives, and actionable policy recommendations, this interdisciplinary effort undoubtedly will become a go-to resource in meeting the mental-health needs of Latinos. -- Glenn Flores, MD, FAAP, Director, Division of General Pediatrics, Professor of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, and Public Health, The Judith and Charles Ginsburg Chair in Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center and Children's Medical Center Dallas

Anbieter: Dodax AT
Stand: 24.01.2020
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Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health
90,94 € *
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Latinos are the fastest growing and largest minority group in the United States. In 2008, this group numbered over 47 million, by 2050, the population is expected to triple, reaching 133 million. Traditionally, Latinos have immigrated to large urban centers (e.g., New York, Los Angeles) that over long periods of time developed a complex infrastructure to receive new immigrants. Increasingly, new Spanish-speaking immigrants are moving into areas of the country previously unfamiliar to them. Although urban co-ethnic communities continue to be the destination of many newcomers, immigrants from Mexico, Central America, and South America in pursuit of low-skilled labor opportunities are settling in small towns and rural areas of the South and Midwest. This new demographic trend has resulted in the creation of the term "new growth communities," which refers to small rural areas that are now home to a small but rapidly growing Hispanic population. Unfortunately, these communities, which are now present in many states across the country (e.g., Illinois, North Carolina), lack the infrastructure necessary to meet the needs of Latino immigrants (e.g., access to health care, immigration assistance, and breaking down language barriers). The lack of an infrastructure and the lack of an established ethnic community to facilitate the assimilation of new immigrants present an ongoing challenge, especially in the area of Latino mental health. The volume focuses on dealing with systemic issues and on providing innovative ideas for development of infrastructure of services. This text will advance ways to understand and ameliorate mental health disparities both from research and experiential perspectives. The growing Latino population of the United States stands poised to shape the nation s future throughout the twenty-first century, yet serious obstacles hinder the full participation of the Latino community in American society. Access to mental health care poses a particular challenge for many segments of the population. Although significant scholarship has focused on the delivery of culturally competent practice, few academic resources address systemic issues that affect the actual delivery of services to Latino clients. In response, Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health provides the first interdisciplinary guide aimed at improving access to mental health services. Experts from several specialties provide state-of-the-art analyses and innovative strategies for tackling the structural, organizational, and linguistic issues that contribute to service inequities. Collectively, the book chapters call attention to clinical, geographical, and social contexts, as well as to populations as varied as breast cancer survivors, rural new growth communities, and unaccompanied immigrant youth. The authors provide an exquisite array of intersecting topics linked by a common theme: the need for a broad social response to transform mental health service for Latinos. Among the topics covered:· Infrastructure development aimed at specific dimensions of structural inequality· The role of government in facilitating the development of infrastructures· The need for federal policy to protect immigrants and aid in their incorporation · Building local infrastructures attuned to the specific needs of communities· Developing a bilingual workforce through interdisciplinary collaboration, organizational planning, and training of staff and interpreters · Addressing the mental health needs of Latino youth in the juvenile justice system· Expanding educational opportunities for first-generation college students· Supporting Latino families caring for persons with serious mental illness"An extraordinary contribution to multiple stakeholders. Provides guideposts for policy-makers, administrators, researchers and clinicians alike. -- Patricia Arredondo, EdD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of WI-Milwaukee This book's comprehensive compendium of knowledge of Latino mental health makes it indispensable reading not only for mental health professionals, social workers and educators but for all those interested in the psychology and culture of the fastest growing population in America. -- Pastora San Juan Cafferty, PhD, Professor Emerita, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago This book addresses tremendous gaps in the fields of Latino mental health and healthcare. Packed with useful information, innovative perspectives, and actionable policy recommendations, this interdisciplinary effort undoubtedly will become a go-to resource in meeting the mental-health needs of Latinos. -- Glenn Flores, MD, FAAP, Director, Division of General Pediatrics, Professor of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, and Public Health, The Judith and Charles Ginsburg Chair in Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center and Children's Medical Center Dallas

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 24.01.2020
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Race Related Stress of Latino Elders
50,40 € *
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There is a paucity of information to help guide mental health practitioners explore the ways that racism influences a client?s well being (Harrell, 2000). The stress caused by racism has been documented to affect the psychological well being of minorities (Harrell, 2000, Clark, Anderson, Clark, & Williams, 1999). The majority of the research involving race related stress has focused almost exclusively on African Americans. Despite the growing Latino population in the United States, there is substantially less research examining their perceived discriminatory experiences (Araujo & Borrell, 2006). Although the elderly subgroup is a population that has been largely ignored in the research with Latinos, it has been established that they are at a high risk for multiple psychological and physical ailments (Tran, Fitzpatrick, Berg, & Wright, 1996, Black, Markides, & Miller, 1998, Canabal & Quiles, 1995, Gonzalez, Haan, & Hinton, 2001, Harris, Eastman, Cowie, Flegal, & Eberhardt, 1999). This work investigated factors that impact the relationship between race related stress and quality of life of first generation immigrant Latino elders.

Anbieter: Dodax AT
Stand: 24.01.2020
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Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health
93,49 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Latinos are the fastest growing and largest minority group in the United States. In 2008, this group numbered over 47 million, by 2050, the population is expected to triple, reaching 133 million. Traditionally, Latinos have immigrated to large urban centers (e.g., New York, Los Angeles) that over long periods of time developed a complex infrastructure to receive new immigrants. Increasingly, new Spanish-speaking immigrants are moving into areas of the country previously unfamiliar to them. Although urban co-ethnic communities continue to be the destination of many newcomers, immigrants from Mexico, Central America, and South America in pursuit of low-skilled labor opportunities are settling in small towns and rural areas of the South and Midwest. This new demographic trend has resulted in the creation of the term "new growth communities," which refers to small rural areas that are now home to a small but rapidly growing Hispanic population. Unfortunately, these communities, which are now present in many states across the country (e.g., Illinois, North Carolina), lack the infrastructure necessary to meet the needs of Latino immigrants (e.g., access to health care, immigration assistance, and breaking down language barriers). The lack of an infrastructure and the lack of an established ethnic community to facilitate the assimilation of new immigrants present an ongoing challenge, especially in the area of Latino mental health. The volume focuses on dealing with systemic issues and on providing innovative ideas for development of infrastructure of services. This text will advance ways to understand and ameliorate mental health disparities both from research and experiential perspectives. The growing Latino population of the United States stands poised to shape the nation s future throughout the twenty-first century, yet serious obstacles hinder the full participation of the Latino community in American society. Access to mental health care poses a particular challenge for many segments of the population. Although significant scholarship has focused on the delivery of culturally competent practice, few academic resources address systemic issues that affect the actual delivery of services to Latino clients. In response, Creating Infrastructures for Latino Mental Health provides the first interdisciplinary guide aimed at improving access to mental health services. Experts from several specialties provide state-of-the-art analyses and innovative strategies for tackling the structural, organizational, and linguistic issues that contribute to service inequities. Collectively, the book chapters call attention to clinical, geographical, and social contexts, as well as to populations as varied as breast cancer survivors, rural new growth communities, and unaccompanied immigrant youth. The authors provide an exquisite array of intersecting topics linked by a common theme: the need for a broad social response to transform mental health service for Latinos. Among the topics covered:· Infrastructure development aimed at specific dimensions of structural inequality· The role of government in facilitating the development of infrastructures· The need for federal policy to protect immigrants and aid in their incorporation · Building local infrastructures attuned to the specific needs of communities· Developing a bilingual workforce through interdisciplinary collaboration, organizational planning, and training of staff and interpreters · Addressing the mental health needs of Latino youth in the juvenile justice system· Expanding educational opportunities for first-generation college students· Supporting Latino families caring for persons with serious mental illness"An extraordinary contribution to multiple stakeholders. Provides guideposts for policy-makers, administrators, researchers and clinicians alike. -- Patricia Arredondo, EdD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of WI-Milwaukee This book's comprehensive compendium of knowledge of Latino mental health makes it indispensable reading not only for mental health professionals, social workers and educators but for all those interested in the psychology and culture of the fastest growing population in America. -- Pastora San Juan Cafferty, PhD, Professor Emerita, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago This book addresses tremendous gaps in the fields of Latino mental health and healthcare. Packed with useful information, innovative perspectives, and actionable policy recommendations, this interdisciplinary effort undoubtedly will become a go-to resource in meeting the mental-health needs of Latinos. -- Glenn Flores, MD, FAAP, Director, Division of General Pediatrics, Professor of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, and Public Health, The Judith and Charles Ginsburg Chair in Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center and Children's Medical Center Dallas

Anbieter: Dodax AT
Stand: 24.01.2020
Zum Angebot
Race Related Stress of Latino Elders
49,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

There is a paucity of information to help guide mental health practitioners explore the ways that racism influences a client?s well being (Harrell, 2000). The stress caused by racism has been documented to affect the psychological well being of minorities (Harrell, 2000, Clark, Anderson, Clark, & Williams, 1999). The majority of the research involving race related stress has focused almost exclusively on African Americans. Despite the growing Latino population in the United States, there is substantially less research examining their perceived discriminatory experiences (Araujo & Borrell, 2006). Although the elderly subgroup is a population that has been largely ignored in the research with Latinos, it has been established that they are at a high risk for multiple psychological and physical ailments (Tran, Fitzpatrick, Berg, & Wright, 1996, Black, Markides, & Miller, 1998, Canabal & Quiles, 1995, Gonzalez, Haan, & Hinton, 2001, Harris, Eastman, Cowie, Flegal, & Eberhardt, 1999). This work investigated factors that impact the relationship between race related stress and quality of life of first generation immigrant Latino elders.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 24.01.2020
Zum Angebot
¡Si se puede! First-generation latino immigrant
89,90 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

¡Si se puede! First-generation latino immigrant ab 89.9 € als Taschenbuch: . Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Wissenschaft, Pädagogik,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 24.01.2020
Zum Angebot