Angebote zu "Jason" (16 Treffer)

Kategorien

Shops

Signs of Power in Habsburg Spain and the New World
127,39 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Erscheinungsdatum: 28.03.2013, Medium: Buch, Einband: Gebunden, Titel: Signs of Power in Habsburg Spain and the New World, Redaktion: Lopez Alemany, Ignacio // Mccloskey, Jason, Verlag: Bucknell University Press, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: LITERARY CRITICISM // American // Hispanic American // Bezug zu Latino-Amerikanern, Rubrik: Literaturwissenschaft // Englische, Amerikanische, Seiten: 270, Informationen: HC gerader Rücken kaschiert, Gewicht: 572 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Latino World Order
39,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The Latino World Order was a professional wrestling stable that existed in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) in 1998 and 1999 led by Eddie Guerrero. The name of the stable was invented by Jason Hervey and was inspired by and intended as a mockery of the famous New World Order (nWo).

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Voices of Theory
34,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Voices of Theory was an R&B group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Voices of Theory came to be when five Latino North Philadelphians - joined up in 1993 to form an R&B group and became known as the Latin version of their strongest musical influence, Boyz II Men. Originally known as B.A.D. (Boyz Around D''way) then as "Theory," their first major tour was in 1993, when they opened for Mariah Carey for 12 nights of her 1993 tour in North America.Later that year, they signed on to record "Why Do Fools Fall in Love," the theme song of the film Calendar Girl.Staring Jason Priestly and Jerry O''Connell.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora
86,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

A volume in Education Policy in Practice: Critical Cultural Studies Series Editors Edmund T. Hamann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Rodney Hopson, George Mason University For most of US history, most of America's Latino population has lived in nine states-California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Illinois, Florida, New Jersey, and New York. It follows that most education research that considered the experiences of Latino families with US schools came from these same states. But in the last 30 years Latinos have been resettling across the US, attending schools, and creating new patterns of inter-ethnic interaction in educational settings. Much of this interaction with this New Latino Diaspora has been initially tentative and improvisational, but too often it has left intact the patterns of lower educational success that have prevailed in the traditional Latino diaspora. Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora is an extensive update, with all new material, of the groundbreaking volume Education in the New Latino Diaspora (Ablex Publishing) that these same editors produced in 2002. This volume consciously includes a number of junior scholars (e.g., C. Allen Lynn, Soria Colomer, Amanda Morales, Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Adam Sawyer) and more established ones (Frances Contreras, Jason Irizarry, Socorro Herrera, Linda Harklau) as it considers empirical cases from Washington State to Georgia, from the Mid-Atlantic to the Great Plains, where rural, suburban, and urban communities start their second or third decades of responding to a previously unprecedented growth in newcomer Latino populations. With excuses of surprise and improvisational strategies less persuasive as Latino newcomer populations become less new, this volume considers the persistence, the anomie, and pragmatism of Latino newcomers on the one hand, with the variously enlightened, paternalistic, dismissive, and xenophobic responses of educators and education systems on the other. With foci as personal as accounts of growing up as an adoptee in a mixed race family and the testimonio of a 'successful' undocumented college graduate to the macro scale of examining state-level education policies and with an age range from early childhood education to the university level, this volume insists that the worlds of education research and migration studies can both gain from considering the educational responses in the last two decades to the 'newish' Latino presence in the 41 U.S. states that have not long been the home to large, well-established Latino populations, but that now enroll 2.5 million Latino students in K-12 alone.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora...
158,00 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

A volume in Education Policy in Practice: Critical Cultural Studies Series Editors Edmund T. Hamann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Rodney Hopson, George Mason University For most of US history, most of America's Latino population has lived in nine states-California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Illinois, Florida, New Jersey, and New York. It follows that most education research that considered the experiences of Latino families with US schools came from these same states. But in the last 30 years Latinos have been resettling across the US, attending schools, and creating new patterns of inter-ethnic interaction in educational settings. Much of this interaction with this New Latino Diaspora has been initially tentative and improvisational, but too often it has left intact the patterns of lower educational success that have prevailed in the traditional Latino diaspora. Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora is an extensive update, with all new material, of the groundbreaking volume Education in the New Latino Diaspora (Ablex Publishing) that these same editors produced in 2002. This volume consciously includes a number of junior scholars (e.g., C. Allen Lynn, Soria Colomer, Amanda Morales, Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Adam Sawyer) and more established ones (Frances Contreras, Jason Irizarry, Socorro Herrera, Linda Harklau) as it considers empirical cases from Washington State to Georgia, from the Mid-Atlantic to the Great Plains, where rural, suburban, and urban communities start their second or third decades of responding to a previously unprecedented growth in newcomer Latino populations. With excuses of surprise and improvisational strategies less persuasive as Latino newcomer populations become less new, this volume considers the persistence, the anomie, and pragmatism of Latino newcomers on the one hand, with the variously enlightened, paternalistic, dismissive, and xenophobic responses of educators and education systems on the other. With foci as personal as accounts of growing up as an adoptee in a mixed race family and the testimonio of a 'successful' undocumented college graduate to the macro scale of examining state-level education policies and with an age range from early childhood education to the university level, this volume insists that the worlds of education research and migration studies can both gain from considering the educational responses in the last two decades to the 'newish' Latino presence in the 41 U.S. states that have not long been the home to large, well-established Latino populations, but that now enroll 2.5 million Latino students in K-12 alone.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Street Science: Community Knowledge and Environ...
58,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

When environmental health problems arise in a community, policymakers must be able to reconcile the first-hand experience of local residents with recommendations by scientists. In this highly original look at environmental health policymaking, Jason Corburn shows the ways that local knowledge can be combined with professional techniques to achieve better solutions for environmental health problems. He traces the efforts of a low-income community in Brooklyn to deal with health problems in its midst and offers a framework for understanding 'street science' -- decision making that draws on community knowledge and contributes to environmental justice.Like many other low-income urban communities, the Greenpoint/Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn suffers more than its share of environmental problems, with a concentration of polluting facilities and elevated levels of localized air pollutants. Corburn looks at four instances of street science in Greenpoint/Williamsburg, where community members and professionals combined forces to address the risks from subsistence fishing from the polluted East River, the asthma epidemic in the Latino community, childhood lead poisoning, and local sources of air pollution. These episodes highlight both the successes and the limits of street science and demonstrate ways residents can establish their own credibility when working with scientists. Street science, Corburn argues, does not devalue science; it revalues other kinds of information and democratizes the inquiry and decision-making processes.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Latino Representation in State Houses and Congress
110,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

This book argues that Latino representation in US legislative institutions is shaped not only by demographics but by legislative institutional design, as well as elite-driven methods, features of the electoral system, and the increasing mainstreaming of Latinos in American society. The election of Latino legislators in the United States is thus complex and varied. This book provides evidence on how successful Latinos have been in winning state legislative and congressional districts in which they have no natural advantage. In particular, this book demonstrates that Latino candidates benefit from higher percentages of Latino citizens in the state, more liberal citizenries and citizen legislatures. Jason Casellas argues that the legislatures most conducive to the election of Latino candidates are Florida, New Mexico and California, whereas the least conducive are the US House and New York.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora
59,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

For most of US history, most of America's Latino population has lived in nine states-California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Illinois, Florida, New Jersey, and New York. It follows that most education research that considered the experiences of Latino families with US schools came from these same states. But in the last 30 years Latinos have been resettling across the US, attending schools, and creating new patterns of inter-ethnic interaction in educational settings. Much of this interaction with this New Latino Diaspora has been initially tentative and improvisational, but too often it has left intact the patterns of lower educational success that have prevailed in the traditional Latino diaspora. Revisiting Education in the New Latino Diaspora is an extensive update, with all new material, of the groundbreaking volume Education in the New Latino Diaspora (Ablex Publishing) that these same editors produced in 2002. This volume consciously includes a number of junior scholars (e.g., C. Allen Lynn, Soria Colomer, Amanda Morales, Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Adam Sawyer) and more established ones (Frances Contreras, Jason Irizarry, Socorro Herrera, Linda Harklau) as it considers empirical cases from Washington State to Georgia, from the Mid-Atlantic to the Great Plains, where rural, suburban, and urban communities start their second or third decades of responding to a previously unprecedented growth in newcomer Latino populations. With excuses of surprise and improvisational strategies less persuasive as Latino newcomer populations become less new, this volume considers the persistence, the anomie, and pragmatism of Latino newcomers on the one hand, with the variously enlightened, paternalistic, dismissive, and xenophobic responses of educators and education systems on the other. With foci as personal as accounts of growing up as an adoptee in a mixed race family and the testimonio of a 'successful' undocumented college graduate to the macro scale of examining state-level education policies and with an age range from early childhood education to the university level, this volume insists that the worlds of education research and migration studies can both gain from considering the educational responses in the last two decades to the 'newish' Latino presence in the 41 U.S. states that have not long been the home to large, wellestablished Latino populations, but that now enroll 2.5 million Latino students in K-12 alone. 'Timely and compelling, Revisiting Education in the NLD offers new insight into the Latino Diaspora in the US just as the discussions regarding immigration policy, bilingual education, and immigrant rights are gaining steam. Drawing from a variety of perspectives, contributing authors interrogate the very concept of the diaspora. The wide range of research in this volume thoughtfully illustrates the nuanced phenomena and provides rich descriptions of complex situations. No longer a simple question of immigration, the book considers language and legal status in schools, international adoption, teacher preparation, and the relationships between established and relatively new Latino communities in a variety of contexts. Comprised of rich, thoughtful research Revisiting Education provides a fascinating window into the context of Latino reception nationwide. ~ Rebecca M. Callahan, Associate Professor - University of Texas-Austin As the leader of a 10-years-and-counting research study in Mexico that has identified and interviewed transnationally mobile students with prior experience in U.S. schools, I can affirm that in addition to students with backgrounds in California, Arizona, Texas, and Colorado, migration links now join schools in Georgia, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Alabama, etc. to schools in Mexico. For that reason and many others I am excited to see this far-ranging, interdisciplinary, new text that considers policy implementation through lenses as different as teacher preparation, Latino adoption into culturally mixed families, the fate of Latino newcomers in 'low density' districts where there are few like them, and the misuse of Spanish teachers as interpreters. This is an relevant book for American educators and scholars, but also for readers beyond U.S. borders. Hamann, Wortham, Murillo, and

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot
Latino Representation in State Houses and Congress
110,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

This book argues that Latino representation in US legislative institutions is shaped not only by demographics but by legislative institutional design, as well as elite-driven methods, features of the electoral system, and the increasing mainstreaming of Latinos in American society. The election of Latino legislators in the United States is thus complex and varied. This book provides evidence on how successful Latinos have been in winning state legislative and congressional districts in which they have no natural advantage. In particular, this book demonstrates that Latino candidates benefit from higher percentages of Latino citizens in the state, more liberal citizenries and citizen legislatures. Jason Casellas argues that the legislatures most conducive to the election of Latino candidates are Florida, New Mexico and California, whereas the least conducive are the US House and New York.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.05.2020
Zum Angebot